Perishables/Frozen Goods

Shipping Perishables

Having the right partners is the most important component to shipping perishables successfully. SGL’s logistics specialists have considerable experience in shipping perishable cargo whether it be frozen, chilled or simply temperature controlled in an insulated container. Many factors are evaluated prior to shipping to determine the most efficient routing to maintain optimal temperatures and the overall integrity of the cargo. Determining factors to ensure the safest routing include the following:

  • What is the commodity of the cargo? – Should the assets be classified as Biomedical or Pharmaceutical, SGL will have the items packaged and labeled, Dangerous Goods Declarations cut if necessary and routed according to MSDS instruction.
  • Does the cargo require Dry Ice? – The U.S. DOT and International Air Transport Association (IATA) have established federal rules that govern the shipment of Dry Ice via Ground or Air due to the potential dangers of the substance if not handled properly. Risks include explosion, suffocation and contact hazards. These risks can be managed by simply following some basic rules and requirements. For shipments that require dry ice, specific rules and federal regulations must be followed in order to avoid potential transit delays or fines. Dry Ice is considered a Dangerous Good / hazardous Material for air transport and requires special handling. SGL employees have completed “function specific” hazardous goods training as per federal guidelines and therefore can legally handle these shipments. When dry ice changes to carbon dioxide gas in enclosed spaces like aircraft cargo holds, it displaces oxygen. The design and construction of packaging used for dry ice shipments must prevent the buildup of pressure that could cause rupturing. Dry ice must never be placed in an airtight container. Below are the packaging requirements for “Dry Ice Shipments”:
    • Shipments are packaged to withstand handling in different orientations
    • Containers with insulated foam inserts are purchased if not already packed by manufacturer properly.
    • Materials that can melt or thaw are bagged in watertight plastic containers.
    •  Carton is precooled, if possible
    • Materials are arranged inside the insulated carton allowing space for dry ice
    • Enough Dry Ice to last a minimum transit time of 48 hours is placed on top and around materials in the carton
    • Void space is filled with dunnage such as peanuts, bubble wrap, brown paper, etc.
    • Close the liner bag (if used) but do not completely seal it, as the carbon dioxide gas created by the dry ice must be allowed to vent.
    • Place the lid on the insulated container.
    • Place the insulated container inside an outer corrugated box.
    • Close and securely tape the carton.
    • Complete the required paperwork, dangerous goods labeling and markings. The following permanent markings are required on the outer packaging of all air shipments:
    • “Dry Ice” or “Carbon Dioxide Solid.”
    • “UN 1845.”
    • Net weight of dry ice in kilograms.
    • Name and address of the shipper.
    • Name and address of the recipient

Form for dry ice usage in shipping perishables

    • Weights and Dimensions, Origin and Destination, Commodities and any “temperature sensitivity” information is provided to several Air Carriers and Destination Agents for Quote. Routing and Carriers used is contingent upon Express Services offered and ability to transport dry ice or hazardous material shipments to the destination regions to ensure frozen materials maintain a constant temperature during transit.
    • Does the cargo require refrigeration?
      For shipments that require being kept cold but not frozen, refrigerants such as gel packs are used as they do not cause a container to leak when proper packaging is provided. Below are the requirements for “Refrigerated Shipments”:

      • Shipments are packaged to withstand handling in different orientations
      • Containers with insulated foam inserts are purchased if not already packed by manufacturer properly.
      • Refrigerated materials that can melt or thaw are bagged in watertight plastic containers.
      • Labels are created to include the Shipper and the Consignee information and placed on the outside of the carton.
      • Enough Gel Coolants to last a minimum transit time of 30 hours are frozen according to manufacturer’s guidelines
      • Carton is precooled, if possible
      • Materials are arranged inside the insulated carton allowing space for coolants
      • Coolants are placed on top and around materials in the carton
      • Void space is filled with dunnage such as peanuts, bubble wrap, brown paper, etc.
      • Carton is closed and securely sealed.
      • Shipments of refrigerated items are avoided over holiday periods and weekends to avoid possible transit delays.
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